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Events

Curated Conversations: Exhibiting Culture

5 to 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 29

Part of the Anchorage Museum Polar Lab’s Curated Conversations series, “Exhibiting Culture” will be a searching discussion about cultural ownership and representation of indigenous art, and particularly contemporary art, in museums and other public spaces. The panel conversation will address a flurry of recent controversies surrounding this topic, and explore ways to build to powerful narratives around sensitive and/or contentious histories and objects.

The discussion will be moderated by Kathleen Ash-Milby, associate curator of contemporary Indigenous art, National Museum of the American Indian in New York. Participants include:

Melissa Shaginoff, Athabascan and Paiute, artist and Bunnel Street Arts Center board member in Homer, Alaska
Christina Lalonde, associate curator of Indigenous art, National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa
Dawn Biddison, museum specialist, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska office

Curated Conversations: Exhibiting Culture

David Jensen Lecture: Adventures with Layla and Dogs on Alaska’s Trails

7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 6

Local photographer David Jensen, recognized by Alaska Dispatch News readers as “2016 Best of Alaska Photographer,” will provide a visual stroll along Alaska trails with hundreds of dogs. He will share engaging anecdotes from the trail and beyond, and talk about his newly released photo books. Joining him at this event is Jensen’s canine hiking companion, Layla. Free.

David Jensen Lecture: Adventures with Layla and Dogs on Alaska’s Trails

Vision & Voice Lecture Series: Ric Burns

7 p.m. Friday Oct. 13

An American documentary filmmaker and writer, Ric Burns has written, directed and produced historical documentaries since the 1990s, beginning with his collaboration on the celebrated PBS series The Civil War (1990), which he produced with his older brother Ken Burns.


The Anchorage Museum’s Vision & Voice lecture series features thought leaders from history, film, literature, science and culture, who reflect upon the human experience. In conjunction with the opening of the Alaska exhibition, this series explores powerful storytelling, issues of race and gender, and the possibilities that come with thought-provoking conversations and innovative thinking.

Register

Vision & Voice Lecture Series: Ric Burns

Family Art Class with HARRY POTTER ILLUSTRATOR CLIFF WRIGHT: Nature of Seeing

2 to 4 p.m. Saturday Oct. 14

Take advantage of this extraordinary opportunity to learn from UK illustrator Cliff Wright, well known for his work on the original book covers for the Harry Potter book series. Wright has illustrated numerous children’s picture books, some of which he’s written himself, in addition to magazines, greeting cards, posters and advertising projects. In this drawing class, Wright helps participants channel their creativity by helping them see beyond the surface of what they can see. No experience needed. Best for ages 6 and older. $10 per registrant, members receive a 10 percent discount. Pre-register at anchoragemuseum.org.

Image: © Cliff Wright - Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban, published by Bloomsbury

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Family Art Class with HARRY POTTER ILLUSTRATOR CLIFF WRIGHT: Nature of Seeing

Melting the Ice Curtain: A Discussion with David Ramseur

6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18

On the 150th anniversary of Alaska’s transfer to the US from Russia, Anchorage author David Ramseur discusses a prolific period in Alaska-Russia relations, the post-Cold War melting of the Ice Curtain and future U.S.-Russia relations. A visiting scholar in public policy at UAA’s Institute of Social and Economic Research, Ramseur has just completed a new book, Melting the Ice Curtain: The Extraordinary Story of Citizen Diplomacy on the Russia-Alaska Frontier. Free; use the museum’s 7th Avenue entrance.

Melting the Ice Curtain: A Discussion with David Ramseur

Vision & Voice Lecture Series: Nikole Hannah-Jones

7 p.m. Friday Nov. 10

National Magazine Award-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones writes on modern-day civil rights for New York Times Magazine. An investigative journalist, she covers racial injustice and has written extensively on the history of racism and inequality, and is recognized as an authority on housing discrimination and racial segregation, desegregation and desegregation in American schools. She was named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists and to The Root 100. She is also a 2017 New America Emerson fellow.


The Anchorage Museum’s Vision & Voice lecture series features thought leaders from history, film, literature, science and culture, who reflect upon the human experience.  In conjunction with the opening of the Alaska exhibition, this series explores powerful storytelling, issues of race and gender, and the possibilities that come with thought-provoking conversations and innovative thinking.

Register

Vision & Voice Lecture Series: Nikole Hannah-Jones

Vision & Voice Lecture Series: Steven Johnson

7 p.m. Friday Dec. 8

An American popular science author and media theorist, Steven Johnson has authored nine books focusing on the intersection of science, technology and personal experience. He is co-creator of three influential websites: the pioneering online magazine FEED; the Webby Award-winning community site Plastic.com; and the hyperlocal media site outside.in. A contributing editor to Wired, he writes regularly for the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Financial Times, among others. His book, “How We Got To Now,” became a PBS six-part series.


The Anchorage Museum’s Vision & Voice lecture series features thought leaders from history, film, literature, science and culture, who reflect upon the human experience.  In conjunction with the opening of the Alaska exhibition, this series explores powerful storytelling, issues of race and gender, and the possibilities that come with thought-provoking conversations and innovative thinking.

 

Register

Vision & Voice Lecture Series: Steven Johnson