Related
Events

Melting the Ice Curtain: A Discussion with David Ramseur

6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18

On the 150th anniversary of Alaska’s transfer to the US from Russia, Anchorage author David Ramseur discusses a prolific period in Alaska-Russia relations, the post-Cold War melting of the Ice Curtain and future U.S.-Russia relations. A visiting scholar in public policy at UAA’s Institute of Social and Economic Research, Ramseur has just completed a new book, Melting the Ice Curtain: The Extraordinary Story of Citizen Diplomacy on the Russia-Alaska Frontier. Free; use the museum’s 7th Avenue entrance.

Melting the Ice Curtain: A Discussion with David Ramseur

Unbound: Mother Tongues

6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 20

More than 100 languages are spoken in Anchorage. Gather for readings and discussion to explore the challenges and possibilities of translation and the role of language revitalization. Writers will share their work in conversation with local experts, scholars and educators. The museum’s Unbound series loosens words from the page through experimental literary events. Included with admission, which is half-price on Fridays from 6 to 9 p.m. for Polar Nights.

 

  Film by Ron Spatz of Shaawatke’é’s Birth, a poem by Emily Wall and Lance X’unei Lance Twitchell (performed in English and Tlingit)

  Junior Gisa, storyteller (reading in Samoan)

  Itzel Yager, author (reading in Spanish, English and Nahuatl)

  Edna MacLean, scholar of Inupiaq language, (reading in Inupiaq)

  Gabriel M. Garcia, PhD, MA, MPH, Associate Professor of Public Health, UAA Department of Health Sciences (reading in Filipino)

  Annie Zeng, Associate Professor of Chinese, Director of UAA Confucius Institute, Department of Languages, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage (reading in Chinese)

  Moderator of post reading conversation: Kathryn Ohle, Assistant Professor in Early Childhood Education at the University of Alaska Anchorage

Mai Xiong, reading in Hmong

Unbound: Mother Tongues

Anchorage Museum Continuing Education Class: Alaska History

10 a.m. to noon, Wednesday, Oct. 25

The third in this continuing education series features a tour of the Alaska exhibition with Aaron Leggett, curator of Alaska history and culture, and a presentation with Ann Fienup Riordan, PhD, about lessons learned while working on a highway project along the Bering Sea. The Anchorage Museum Continuing Education Program is a seasonal series of classes featuring art, science, history or anthropology experts who will illuminate themes explored in the museum’s exhibitions and collections. $20. Register by Oct. 24 at anchoragemuseum.org.

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Anchorage Museum Continuing Education Class: Alaska History

Urban Homestead 101: Harnessing the Power of Fungi

5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 27

Delve into the fungi kingdom and explore basic mushroom identification and ways to preserve and use these dynamic organisms with Far North Fungi and local mycologist Christin Anderson. $20, members receive 10 percent discount.

Register

Urban Homestead 101: Harnessing the Power of Fungi

Anchorage Museum Continuing Education Class: Art of the North Walkthrough

10 a.m. to noon, Wednesday, Nov. 8

Paintings are never neutral, and whether intended by the artist or not, landscape paintings make powerful and affecting statements about the relationship between people and the land in which they live. Alaska’s most beloved historical artists painted many of the same scenes, and many of the same sorts of Alaskans, but their paintings say very different things about what Alaska means, and what it’s like to live here. Together, we will look at some of their masterworks and ask ourselves what their paintings have to say about Alaska as a place and our relationship to it.

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Anchorage Museum Continuing Education Class: Art of the North Walkthrough

Anchorage Museum Continuing Education Class: The Intersection between NAGPRA and Museums—Dr. Maria Williams

10 a.m. to noon, Wednesday Nov. 22

Dr. Williams will address NAGPRA, the Native American Graves and Repatriation Act of 1990, and its impact in the field of museum studies. She will also talk about related legislation establishing the National Museum of the American Indian. Alaska’s Dinosaurs—Dr. Patrick Druckenmiller [Webex lecture] University of Alaska Fairbanks paleontologist Patrick Druckenmiller will present an overview of Alaskan dinosaurs including the important who, what, when and where’s. The talk will also cover the major questions being addressed in Alaskan dinosaur research and recent discoveries relevant to the new Anchorage Museum exhibit.

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Anchorage Museum Continuing Education Class: The Intersection between NAGPRA and Museums—Dr. Maria Williams

Anchorage Museum Continuing Education Class: Art, Identity and Story in Alaska Native Art—Nadia Jackinsky

10 a.m. to noon, Wednesday, Dec. 6

The arts are a powerful means to sustain and express community and individual identities, to tell stories and remember history. When we look at contemporary Alaska Native art, we have an opportunity to explore ideas, cultural practices and materials that in many cases have been maintained in our communities for centuries. This presentation will look at contemporary Alaska Native artists represented in the Art of the North galleries whose work highlights the power of cultural heritage and identity. Decolonizing the Abbe Museum—Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko [Webex lecture] Director Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko will share information about the Abbe Museum’s journey to change the way the Bar Harbor Maine organization operates with local tribal nations.

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Anchorage Museum Continuing Education Class: Art, Identity and Story in Alaska Native Art—Nadia Jackinsky