Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center
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Field Trips

PRICES

GENERAL ADMISSION
School group general admission is $5 per student.

Chaperones are admitted free in a ratio of one adult per five to eight students; additional chaperones pay general admission rates plus premium exhibition fees when applicable.

PROGRAM FEES
These prices are in addition to student admission.

Docent-Led Tour, $15 per group
Guided Investigation, $100 per group
Tour Plus Investigation, $115 per group
Planetarium Show, $75 per group
Planetarium Guided Experience, $100 per group

For prices and information about Outreach Programs, please click here or call (907) 929-9279.

Prices are subject to change. Payment is due upon arrival via cash, check, or credit card. If you are unable to pay with cash, check, or credit card, you must submit a purchase order prior to your visit and contact the museum's Education Operations Specialist for approval.

REGISTER

Complete field trip registration request form to begin the registration process for a school field trip at the Anchorage Museum.

TEACHERS
Please plan early as field trips fill up quickly. It's recommended that educators schedule at least three weeks before a desired field trip. The museum requires at least two weeks advance notice. Pre-registration is required to receive the reduced educational admission rates. Groups that don't pre-register must pay general admission rates and will not have access to school programs.

FIELD TRIP CANCELATION
To cancel or alter a field trip, please contact the museum five business days prior to a field trip or a cancelation fee may apply. Scheduled field trips that aren't canceled at least two full business days prior will be charged 100% of the program fees. The museum will send a confirmation email to registered educators with important field trip details.

SIBLINGS
The museum requests that parent chaperones not bring siblings on field trips. If it is necessary, the parent must pay full admission for the sibling(s) and any additional fees for premium exhibitions. Siblings are not allowed to participate in field trip activities.

BUSES, PARKING, AND ENTRANCE
If you are traveling by school bus, there is a bus drop-off zone on Seventh Avenue near the main entrance. If parents are driving students to the museum, street parking is available, and there are seven public pay lots within a two-block radius. Visit our website for a detailed list of options. The museum does not validate or reimburse parking fees. The museum opens at 10 a.m. October through April. No early entrance is allowed. For more information on parking, click here.

PHOTOGRAPHY
Cameras are permitted in most exhibitions, but no flash photography, videography, or tripods are allowed. When taking pictures, please respect the barriers around the displays.

GALLERY CLOSURES
Occasionally, areas of the museum are temporarily unavailable due to exhibition installation. To confirm a specific gallery is available, call (907) 929-9280.

FIELD TRIP PREP
Teachers may contact the Education Operations Specialist to schedule a visit prior to the field trip date. This is by appointment only, and only teachers may attend. You will receive museum information and access to galleries included in the upcoming field trip experience. For more information contact (907) 929-9280 or fieldtrips@anchoragemuseum.org.

LUNCH OPTIONS
In order for a field trip group to eat brown bag lunches in the museum's atrium, tables must be reserved in advance. Tables are only available at certain times and are on a first-come, first-served basis. Absolutely no food or drink is allowed in galleries. No exceptions.

CHAPERONE POLICY
One adult chaperone is required for up to eight students. Specific ratios for each group are determined based on grade level, special needs, and school policy. Please note that adults in excess of the ratio must pay full general admission and any additional fees for premium exhibitions. Students must remain with their chaperones at all times while they are in the museum. Museum rules will be explained to chaperones upon arrival, and chaperones are expected to enforce these rules. Failure to adequately supervise students may result in a group being asked to leave. No exceptions.

SCHOLARSHIP ASSISTANCE
Thanks to generous sponsors, some scholarship assistance is available for Gyre and Dena'inaq' Huch'ulyeshi programs, as well as some planetarium shows. To learn more about these opportunities, call (907) 929-9280.

MEMBERSHIP
Membership benefits do not apply to field trips.

CONTACT
Email: fieldtrips@anchoragemuseum.org
Phone: (907) 929-9280
Fax: (907) 929-9290
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PLAN YOUR VISIT

Trained museum educators and docents are extremely effective, but you bring many essential assets to the museum learning experience, including knowledge of the curriculum and understanding of students' abilities and interests.

The Anchorage Museum's exhibitions tell many multicultural and interdisciplinary stories that can engage students in multiple ways. The role of teachers and chaperones is to facilitate student interaction with exhibitions. The best way to prepare for this is to visit the museum before your field trip. Remember to allow ample time for transition between programs, bathroom breaks, lunch, and free-choice exploration.

BEFORE YOUR FIELD TRIP
Pre-visit activities should familiarize students with what they will see and do at the museum. It's also important to discuss appropriate conduct and set expectations. We recommend pre-field trip activities such as reading relevant literature, doing Internet research, or conducting hands-on activities and labs.

AT THE MUSEUM
Choose from one of our educational programs for your field trip experience. In addition to those programs, we encourage leaving time for free-choice exploration. Below, we've outlined some suggested field trip activities to help you develop or modify one of our Focused Trip Sheets for specific grade levels and exhibitions. We suggest you give chaperones the Focused Trip Sheet and the answers. This empowers chaperones to fully participate and guide student exploration.

BACK IN THE CLASSROOM
Provide opportunities for students to connect pre-visit lessons to post-visit concepts and classroom projects. Ask them to dig further into a subject by reading relevant literature, doing Internet research, or conducting experiments. Find specific post-visit activity ideas in the museum's downloadable Focused Trip Sheets.

SUGGESTED FIELD TRIP ACTIVITIES
Foster students' critical thinking skills through the following activities:

  • Sending students on scavenger hunts adds excitement. Allow extra time to examine exhibitions more closely afterward.
  • Re-creating an object by sketching and drawing encourages students to pause and make closer observations.
  • Fact-finding and taking notes are useful ways for students to gather information from label copy and document questions that arise in their investigation.
  • Categorizing objects in exhibitions is an easy way to help students group things together, compare and contrast, and identify similarities and themes.
  • Creating a hypothesis as a pre-visit activity and testing it at the museum prompts students to think critically about real-world applications.
  • Writing or journaling encourages students to reflect on the museum experience, make connections to the classroom, and articulate their opinions.
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PRE-K
Programs are available Fall 2013 (Sept. 3–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–May 16) unless otherwise noted.

GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS
Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 30 minutes.

LEGENDS FOR LITTLE ONES
Students gather in the Alaska History Gallery in front of culture-specific houses for an interactive adventure. Each story includes music, active participation, and art activities to complete in the classroom. Alaska History Gallery. Domain Guidelines: 1, 3, 4, and 5.

  • THE FOX WOMAN (UNANGAX)
  • THE MOSQUITO AND THE RAVEN (TLINGIT)
  • EYE OF THE NEEDLE (YUP'IK)
  • PORCUPINE AND THE BEAVER'S TAIL (ATHABASCAN)

GRADES K–2
Programs are available Fall 2013 (Sept. 3–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–May 16) unless otherwise noted.

DOCENT-LED TOURS
Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., or 1:30 p.m. 45 minutes.

LIFE IN ALASKA
Students travel to the ancient past to learn how Alaska Native people built houses, made clothing, and hunted and gathered food without metal tools or electricity. This tour includes dress-up activities. Alaska History Gallery. History Standards: A. Science Standards: E, F.

EARLY ANCHORAGE
Some of the most fascinating history is right under our noses. This tour focuses on the construction of the Alaska Railroad, early settlement of Anchorage, and Dena'ina Athabascan history. This tour includes hands-on activities with artifacts. Alaska History Gallery. History Standards: A, B. Geography Standards: F.

ART OF THE NORTH
Students learn about Alaska through imagery, objects, landscape, and people. Learners hear the captivating stories behind the art, and find out why Alaska's artists had to be adventurous. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards B, C, D.

GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS
Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 45 minutes.

IS IT DIRT?
What's the difference between soil and dirt? Students scratch the surface of the Earth's top layer and learn how water and time affect precious soils. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, D.

ART OF SEEING
Students play interactive games in the museum's art galleries that encourage them to think and talk about the art they see. Young learners are introduced to new vocabulary and make color observations. Art galleries. Arts Standards: A, B, C, D. History Standards: A.

INTO THE WILD
Sydney Laurence, Alaska's best-known artist, lived a fascinating life. Students learn about him and the mountain he loved to paint. Young learners describe nature, gain inspiration from Laurence's 13-foot-wide painting of Mount McKinley, then create their own watercolor mountain painting. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards: A, B, D. History Standards: A. English/Language Arts Standards: A.

NIGHT DRAWINGS
Students learn about the aurora borealis, including how it is formed, and then experiment with chalk pastels to make colorful drawings of the night sky. Art of the North and South Classroom. Arts Standards: A, D. Science Standards: C. Geography Standards: A.
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GRADES 3–5
Programs are available Fall 2013 (Sept. 3–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–May 16) unless otherwise noted.

DOCENT-LED TOURS
Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., or 1:30 p.m. 45 minutes

ALASKA NATIVE CULTURES
Students learn about Alaska Native culture groups including Unangax, Athabascan, Iñupiat, Yup'ik, and Tlingit. Students explore traditional Alaska Native housing, customs, and lifestyles. Includes hands-on activities. Alaska History Gallery and Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center. History Standards: A, B. Science Standards: E, F. Geography Standards: B. Government and Citizenship Standards: C. Arts Standards: B, D. World Languages Standards: B.

ART OF THE NORTH
Students learn about Alaska through imagery, objects, landscape, and people. Learners hear the captivating stories behind the art, and find out why Alaska's artists had to be adventurous. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards B, C, D.

GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS
Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 45 minutes.

COLD HARD FACTS
Students examine the phases of matter through the unique properties of dry ice and liquid nitrogen. They explore the strange properties of these cold materials through demonstrations and hands-on activities. (Balloons are used in this demonstration.) North Classroom. Science Standards: A, B.

ROCKS ROCK
Using the rock cycle and hands-on earth science exhibits as guides, students navigate the journey from formation to disintegration through the processes of weathering and erosion. Students gain an understanding of the various compositions of rocks and how they are affected by water, wind, and weather. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, D. Geography Standards: C.

EYE TO EYE
Students explore the complex functions of the eye while observing the similarities and differences between cow and human eyes. Students also work through the scientific processes of observation and dissection. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C, G.

ART OF SEEING
Students play interactive games in the museum's art galleries that encourage them to think and talk about the art they see. Learners are introduced to new vocabulary and make color observations. Art galleries. Arts Standards: A, B, C, D. History Standards: A.

INTO THE WILD
Sydney Laurence, Alaska's best-known artist, lived a fascinating life. Students learn about him and the mountain he loved to paint. Learners describe nature, gain inspiration from Laurence's 13-foot-wide painting of Mount McKinley, and then create their own watercolor mountain painting. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards: A, B, D. History Standards: A. English/Language Arts Standards: A.

NIGHT DRAWINGS
Students learn about the aurora borealis, including how the aurora is formed, and experiment with chalk pastels to make colorful drawings of the night sky. Art of the North and South Classroom. Arts Standards: A, D. Science Standards: C. Geography Standards: A.
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GRADES 6–8
Programs are available Fall 2013 (Sept. 3–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–May 16) unless otherwise noted.

DOCENT-LED TOURS
Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., or 1:30 p.m. 45 minutes.

ALASKA HISTORY
This tour spans 10,000 years of Alaska history. Topics include Alaska Native cultures, Russian colonization, statehood, and the trans-Alaska oil pipeline. Students discover why different groups of people came to Alaska and how they shaped history. Alaska History Gallery. History Standards: A, B, C. Geography Standards: B, D, E, F. Government and Citizenship Standards: C. Arts Standards: B, D.

THE FIRST PEOPLES OF ALASKA
Students are given an overview of Alaska's nine indigenous cultures. Students learn about different geographic regions of Alaska through 600 artifacts used in subsistence, celebrations, and community. Exhibition films provide contemporary, firsthand narratives from Alaska Native people about each culture. Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center. History Standards: A, B. Geography Standards B.

ART OF THE NORTH
Students learn about Alaska through imagery, objects, landscape, and people. Learners hear the captivating stories behind the art, and find out why Alaska's artists had to be adventurous. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards B, C, D.

GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS
Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 45 minutes.

HEART TO HEART
Through dissection, students explore the structure and function of the heart while observing the similarities and differences between pig and human hearts. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C, G.

EYE TO EYE
Students explore the complex functions of the eye while observing the similarities and differences between cow and human eyes. Students also work through the scientific processes of observation and dissection. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C, G.

ART OF SEEING
Students play interactive games in the museum's art galleries that encourage them to think and talk about the art they see. Young learners are introduced to new vocabulary and make color observations. Art galleries. Arts Standards: A, B, C, D. History Standards: A.

INTO THE WILD
Sydney Laurence, Alaska's best-known artist, lived a fascinating life. Students learn about him and the mountain he loved to paint. Young learners describe nature, gain inspiration from Laurence's 13-foot-wide painting of Mount McKinley, then write haikus and create their own watercolor mountain painting. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards: A, B, D. History Standards: A. English/Language Arts Standards: A.

NIGHT DRAWINGS
Students learn about the aurora borealis, including how the aurora is formed, and experiment with chalk pastels to make colorful drawings of the night sky. Art of the North and South Classroom. Arts Standards: A, D. Science Standards: C. Geography Standards: A.
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GRADES 9–12
Programs are available Fall 2013 (Sept. 3–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–May 16) unless otherwise noted.

DOCENT-LED TOURS
Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., or 1:30 p.m. 45 minutes.

ALASKA HISTORY
This tour spans 10,000 years of Alaska history. Topics include Alaska Native cultures, Russian colonization, statehood, and the trans-Alaska oil pipeline. Students discover why different groups of people came to Alaska and how they shaped history. Alaska History Gallery. History Standards: A, B, C. Geography Standards: B, D, E, F. Government and Citizenship Standards: C. Arts Standards: B, D.

ART OF THE NORTH
Students learn about Alaska through imagery, objects, landscape, and people. Learners hear the captivating stories behind the art, and find out why Alaska's artists had to be adventurous. Art of the North Gallery. Arts Standards B, C, D.

THE FIRST PEOPLES OF ALASKA
Students are given an overview of Alaska's nine indigenous cultures. Students learn about different geographic regions of Alaska through 600 artifacts used in subsistence, celebrations, and community life. Exhibition films provide firsthand narratives from Alaska Native people about each culture. Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center. History Standards: A, B.

MUSEUM HIGHLIGHTS
A world-class museum located in the heart of Alaska's largest city, the Anchorage Museum is an art museum, natural and cultural history museum, and science center all in one. Roam our galleries and enjoy all the museum has to offer as we highlight some of our favorite objects. Arts Standards: A, B, C, D. Alaska History Gallery. History Standards: A, B, C. Geography Standards: B, D, E, F.

GUIDED INVESTIGATIONS
Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or noon. 45 minutes.

HEART TO HEART
Through dissection, students explore the structure and functions of the heart while observing the similarities and differences between pig and human hearts. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C, G.

EYE TO EYE
Students explore the complex functions of the eye while observing the similarities and differences between cow and human eyes. Students also work through the scientific processes of observation and dissection. North Classroom. Science Standards: A, C, G.

ART OF SEEING
Students play interactive games in the museum's art galleries that encourage them to think and talk about the art they see. Students are introduced to new vocabulary, make color observations, and discuss artists' intent. Art galleries. Arts Standards: A, B, C, D. History Standards: A.

NIGHT DRAWINGS
Students learn about the aurora borealis, how the aurora is formed, and experiment with chalk pastels to make colorful drawings of the night sky back in our classroom. Art of the North and South Classroom. Arts Standards: A, D. Science Standards: C. Geography Standards: A.
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THOMAS PLANETARIUM

The Thomas Planetarium is an exciting way to learn about astronomy and space. The 530-square-foot facility lets students journey to the stars, take trips through the solar system, or join in presentations that explore the night sky. The planetarium seats 44 and includes handicap accessible seating. Planetarium programs are available Fall 2013 (Oct. 1–Dec. 20) and Spring 2014 (Jan. 6–April 30) unless otherwise noted.

PLANETARIUM SHOWS
Planetarium Shows are educational films projected on a full-dome screen. Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 10:30 a.m. or 11:15 a.m. Show length varies.

EARTH, MOON AND SUN (Pre-K–5)
Coyote has a razor-sharp wit, but he's confused about what he sees in the sky. Join this character for a show that discusses American Indian star lore, lunar phases, eclipses, and space exploration. 26 minutes. Science Standards: D, E, F. Geography Standards: A. TEACHER'S GUIDE

DINOSAUR PASSAGE TO PANGAEA (Pre-K–12)
This animated adventure explains one of the greatest geological events in Earth's history: the separation of the supercontinent Pangaea. When two children embark on a geology field trip back in time, they are thrown into a fantastic voyage where they witness incredible geological wonders and learn about the mysterious process that created present-day continents. 40 minutes. Science Standards: D, E, G. Geography Standards: B.

ICE WORLDS (2–12)
Examine the ecosystems that thrive in the Arctic and Antarctic. See how ice shapes landscapes on other planets and moons in our solar system. 25 minutes. Science Standards: A, C, D, E. Geography Standards: E, F.

SEVEN WONDERS (2–12)
Turn back the pages of time to witness the ancient wonders of the world as they appeared thousands of years ago. Travel to Egypt to see the Great Pyramids, to Babylon to explore the fabled Hanging Gardens, and more. See some of the universe's greatest wonders. 32 minutes. Science Standards: D, E. History Standards: B. Geography Standards: B.

NEW HORIZONS (2–12)
Embark on a journey to the planets and moons of our solar system and travel down to the surface of all the planets. Also available in Spanish and Mandarin by request. 23 minutes. Science Standards: D, E, G.
WATCH THE TRAILER

EXPERIENCE THE AURORA (3–12)
Marvel as the Northern Lights shimmer and glisten overhead with time-lapse footage captured in the Arctic Circle. This immersive show is the next best thing to being under Alaska's winter night sky. 26 minutes. Science Standards: C. Geography Standards: A.
WATCH THE TRAILER
TEACHER'S GUIDE

INTO THE DEEP (3-12)
Dive alongside deep-sea research pioneers to learn about marine biology, underwater geology and the history of deep-sea exploration. Traveling in famous historic submersibles, come face-to-face with fascinating underwater creatures such as vampire squid and pelican eels. Discover how diving vessels make these underwater encounters possible for humans. Science Standards: A, C, D, E, G. Geography Standards: E, F

WONDERS OF THE UNIVERSE (3–12)
Peer deep into space through the eyes of the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope and travel back billions of years in time to witness the birth of the universe. Also available in Spanish, Italian, and Mandarin by request. 21 minutes. Science Standards: D, E.
WATCH THE TRAILER

THE LUNAR STORY (3–12)
Learn the moon's story from its formation to its effects on Earth. Explore the relationship between the Earth, moon, and sun through an investigation of seasons, tides, eclipses, and orbital motion. 26 minutes. Science Standards: D. Geography Standards: A, F.

MICROCOSM: THE ADVENTURE WITHIN (4–12)
At the center of nano medicine in the year 2053, viewers shrink down to the size of a microbe and get injected into a patient who is suffering from a mysterious virus. Also available in Spanish by request. 16 minutes. Science Standards: C.

SUPERVOLCANOS (5–12)
Travel back in time and experience the massive volcanic eruptions that shaped the Earth and solar system. Journey to Yellowstone National Park, Neptune's moon Triton and Jupiter's moon Io to witness historic eruptions. Could a supervolcano erupt in our era? Scientists weigh in. 35 minutes. Science Standards: A, C, D, E, G, F. Geography Standards: E, F. History: A.
TEACHERS GUIDE

OUR LIVING CLIMATE (5–12)
Learn about the delicate balance required to support life by comparing Earth to its neighbors - the moon and Venus. Discover how the Earth's climate is a complex system that changes over millennia. 28 minutes. Science Standards: A, C, D, E, G. Geography Standards: E, F.
TEACHER'S GUIDE

LIFE: A COSMIC STORY
How did life on Earth begin? Find out on this journey through time. Witness key events since the Big Bang that set the stage for life. See the first stars ignite, galaxies coalesce and entire worlds take shape. On a young Earth, two scenarios for the dawn of life are presented - one near a turbulent, deep-sea hydrothermal vent, and the other in a primordial hot puddle on a volcanic island. 25 minutes. Science Standards: A, B, C, D.
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PLANETARIUM GUIDED EXPERIENCES
In each Guided Planetarium Experience, students learn about visible objects, constellations, and recent astronomy news. In addition, you may choose one of the focus areas listed below. Available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. or 11:15 a.m. 30–45 minutes.

STARLORE (K–12)
Take a closer look at stories that various cultures have told to explain astronomical phenomena. Science Standards: D, E, F. Geography Standards: A. History Standards: A.

MOTION OF EARTH (K–12)
Learn how the rotation and revolution of the planets affect us on Earth. Science Standards: D, E, G. Geography Standards: A.

SIZE AND SCALE OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM (3–12)
Gain an understanding of the size of our solar system, galaxy, and universe. Science Standards: D, G. Geography Standards: A.

CELESTIAL NAVIGATION (3–12)
Discover how different cultures throughout history have used the stars to navigate the Earth. Science Standards: D, E, G. Geography Standards: A. History Standards: A.

SHOWS COURTESY OF EXXONMOBIL
Thanks to sponsor ExxonMobil, a limited number of Planetarium showings are available to school groups at no cost. General admission is included. Shows will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

2013-14 EDUCATOR CATALOG

TO REGISTER FOR A FIELD TRIP
Complete field trip registration request form.

QUESTIONS?
Call (907) 929-9280 or email fieldtrips@anchoragemuseum.org.

PROGRAM FEES

Fees do not include museum admission.

Docent-led Tours:
    $15 per group
Guided Investigation:
    $100 per group
Tour Plus Investigation:
    $115 per group
Planetarium Show:
    $75 per group
Planetarium Guided Experience:
    $100 per group

Prices are subject to change. Payment is due upon arrival. Direct payment questions to
(907) 929-9280.

SCHOOL GROUP ADMISSION
School group general admission is $5 per student.

Chaperones are admitted free in a ratio of one adult per five to eight students; additional chaperones pay general admission rates plus premium exhibition fees when applicable.